Corwin Series Lecture: Wilfried Jentzsch

Event Date: 

Wednesday, February 22, 2017 - 6:00pm

Event Date Details: 

Event Location: 

  • Studio Xenakis (Room 2215
  • Music Building)

Event Price: 

Admission is free.

Event Contact: 

Adriane Hill
Marketing and Communications Manager
UC Santa Barbara Department of Music
(805) 893-3230
ahill@music.ucsb.edu
The Corwin Series presents a lecture with Wilfried Jentzsch, "From sound analyses and syntheses to composition relating to Indonesian Gamelan music," on Wednesday, February 22, 2017 at 6 p.m. in Studio Xenakis (Room 2215, Music Building). Admission is free. Born in 1941, Wilfried Jentzsch studied composition in Dresden and Berlin, and electronic music in Cologne. From 1976 to 1981 he studied with Xenakis in Paris obtaining a doctorate in musical aesthetics and concurrently conducting research in digital sound synthesis at the Institute for Research and Coordination in Acoustics/Music (IRCAM) and the Center for Studies in Mathematics and Automated Music (CEMAMu). He was professor of composition in Dresden from 1993 to 2006. A member of the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM) and a founding member of the German Society for Electroacoustic Music (DEGEM), he was composer in residence in Columbus/Ohio and Brussels, as well as in Bourges, Paris and Karlsruhe, where he received international composition prizes. He has been invited to numerous music festivals worldwide.
 
During Wilfried Jentzsch's stay in Java and Bali in 2002, he researched into Gamelan music. He recorded several sets of Gamelan in Yogyakarta (Kraton Sonobudyo) and Surakarta (Sekola Tinggi Seni Indonesia), then analyzed them from the viewpoint of timbre and scales, and also examined various traditional pieces from the viewpoint of central-melody and form. The findings of this investigation became the basis of his compositional strategies; creating Ethno-electroacoustic Music in which the traditional music has been transformed to an experimental music by changing its realistic character into surrealistic expressions. 
Wilfried Jentzsch