Lee Rothfarb

Event Date: 

Sunday, January 3, 2016 - 7:30pm

'In my twenty-first year at UCSB, I look back on a fulfilling and fruitful two decades, which have led my teaching, research, and professional activities in various directions. My undergraduate teaching has focused on eighteenth and early nineteenth-century musical form, and graduate teaching on the history of music theory from ancient times up through the early twentieth century, the theories and analytical methodology of Heinrich Schenker, and the evolving chromatic-harmonic techniques of the nineteenth century. Research on the writings of Austrian (later Swiss) music theorist Ernst Kurth (Ernst Kurth as Theorist and Analyst, 1988; Ernst Kurth: Selected Writings, 1991) expanded to those of composer, theorist, and educationist August Halm (August Halm: A Critical and Creative Life in Music, 2009), and from there to current work on theorist Heinrich Schenker, composer Anton Bruckner, and critic Eduard Hanslick. The 1988 book on Kurth won the Society for Music Theory’s 1989 Outstanding Publication Award, and the research on Halm was supported by a year-long salary-replacement grant from Germany’s Thyssen Foundation.

My most recent scholarly efforts, carried out in Vienna over six months, have been an article on Halm for a forthcoming encyclopedia on music theory and aesthetics, to be published in 2016 by the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics (Frankfurt); a new translation of Hanslick’s watershed music-aesthetics treatise, On the Musically Beautiful (1854), to replace two earlier ones (1891, 1986); and a paper on Schenker’s primary and secondary school education in Galicia, as a way of understanding and contextualizing his mature socio-political dispositions and biases. The paper is an outgrowth of one I published in 2014 on “Heinrich Schenker and ibn Ezra: Literal and Interpretive Meaning in Music,” which appeared in the German journal Musiktheorie. Other projects under way are a study of the early music-analytical reception of Bruckner’s compositional techniques, and an invited paper for a fall 2016 conference in Vienna on Hanslick. Take a tour of some of the sites I visited while in Vienna (below).

From Harvard, where I had taught previously, I brought to UCSB the SMT’s open-access electronic journal Music Theory Online (MTO), which I founded in 1993, and transformed it into a Web format when that now commonplace medium was in its infancy and barely known. My role in founding and editing the journal was featured in the UCSB library’s spring 2014 issue of The Lens. I remained chief editor of the journal until December 1998. I also established and administered the Unix server boethius, which was the SMT’s base of Internet operations in those days, and the host for MTO. For service as the founder in 1989 of the Society’s networking and of MTO, I was honored in 2013 as an SMT Lifetime Member.

Rounding out my work as a scholar and professional in the field are various administrative roles, including service as chair of the Music Department for nine years, as Director of Graduate Studies for six, and, since fall 2015, as Associate Dean in the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts.

My years at UCSB have been rich and gratifying. I am thankful for the many opportunities they have yielded, and for the confidence colleagues have shown by entrusting me with leadership roles. I look forward to several more years of scholarly pursuits, teaching, and service before retirement.' - Professor Lee Rothfarb

 

Take a tour of some of the sites Professor Rothfarb visited while in Vienna:

Workspace in my Vienna apartment.

Workspace in his Vienna apartment.

Beethoven Memorial, near Vienna’s City Park.

Beethoven Memorial, near Vienna's City Park.

Johannes Brahms memorial, City Park

Johannes Brahms memorial, City Park.

Anton Bruckner memorial, City Park

Anton Bruckner memorial, City Park.

Franz Schubert memorial, City Park

Franz Schubert memorial, City Park.

Johann Strauss memorial, City Park

Johann Strauss memorial, City Park.

Belvedere Palace, front view

Belvedere Palace, front view.

Belvedere Palace, back view

Belvedere Palace, back view.

Bruckner’s apartment in the Belvedere Palace

Bruckner’s apartment in the Belvedere Palace.

Bruckner Memorial plaque at Bruckner’s Belvedere apartment

Bruckner Memorial plaque at Bruckner’s Belvedere apartment.

Habsburg Palace façade, Central Vienna

Habsburg Palace façade, Central Vienna.

Café Grienstadl, at the Habsburg Palace, Central Vienna

Café Grienstadl, at the Habsburg Palace, Central Vienna.

Austrian Parliament, on Vienna’s Ringstrasse

Austrian Parliament, on Vienna’s Ringstrasse.

Vienna City Hall, on the Ringstrasse

Vienna City Hall, on the Ringstrasse.

Vienna Musikverein, Concert Hall

Vienna Musikverein, Concert Hall.

Austrian Royal Opera, on the Ringstrasse

Austrian Royal Opera, on the Ringstrasse.

St. Charles Church

St. Charles Church.

Schönbrunn Palace, Vienna outskirts

Schönbrunn Palace, Vienna outskirts.

Hermann Bonitz, mid-19th century Austrian educational reformer, in the Vienna University Arcade

Hermann Bonitz, mid-19th century Austrian educational reformer, in the Vienna University Arcade.

Count Leo Thun-Hohenstein, mid-19th Austriancentury educational reformer, in the Vienna University Arcade

Count Leo Thun-Hohenstein, mid-19th century Austrian educational reformer, in the Vienna University Arcade.

Eduard Hanslick, Musicology professor, music critic (Neue Freie Presse), music aesthetician

Eduard Hanslick, Musicology professor, music critic (Neue Freie Presse), music aesthetician.

Heinrich Schenker’s apartment building front door, Traungasse 1, where Schenker lived 1893-1897

Heinrich Schenker’s apartment building front door, Traungasse 1, where Schenker lived 1893-1897.

Reisnerstraße street sign, in Vienna’s 3rd District, where Schenker lived 1901-1920

Reisnerstraße street sign, in Vienna’s 3rd District, where Schenker lived 1901-1920.

Heinrich Schenker’s Reisnerstraße front door (no. 38)

Heinrich Schenker’s Reisnerstraße front door (no. 38).

Martin Eybl, Schenker scholar, in front of Schenker’s Reisnerstraße apartment

Martin Eybl, Schenker scholar, in front of Schenker’s Reisnerstraße apartment.

Vienna Central Cemetery, Gate 4 sign

Vienna Central Cemetery, Gate 4 sign.

Vienna Central Cemetery, Gate 4, Jewish funeral chapel

Vienna Central Cemetery, Gate 4, Jewish funeral chapel.

Heinrich Schenker’s gravesite, Vienna Central Cemetery, Gate 4

Heinrich Schenker’s gravesite, Vienna Central Cemetery, Gate 4.

Heinrich Schenker’s gravestone

Heinrich Schenker’s gravestone.

Eduard Hanslick’s gravesite, Vienna Central Cemetery

Eduard Hanslick’s gravesite, Vienna Central Cemetery.

Rudolf Kolisch’s gravesite, in Grinzing

Rudolf Kolisch’s gravesite, in Grinzing.

Gustav Mahler’s gravesite, in Grinzing

Gustav Mahler’s gravesite, in Grinzing.