Corwin Chair Series Lecture: JoAnn Kuchera-Morin

Event Date: 

Friday, April 9, 2021 - 11:00am to 12:30pm

Event Date Details: 

 
Zoom link: 
 
Meeting ID: 841 2398 4807

Event Location: 

  • Virtual Event

Event Price: 

Free and open to the public

Event Contact: 

Adriane Cleary
Marketing and Communications Manager
UC Santa Barbara Department of Music
Dr. JoAnn Kuchera-Morin
 
As part of the Corwin Chair Series, composer Dr. JoAnn Kuchera-Morin will give a lecture titled "Using the Creative Process as a Computational Framework for Unfolding Complex Systems" on Friday, April 9, 2021 at 11 am PDT via Zoom. Kuchera-Morin will discuss how we can apply the creative compositional process in building computational languages and computational platforms in order to represent very complex information through our senses, namely visual, audio, and interactive representations. This will facilitate using a distributed computational system such as the AlloSphere instrument and a visual/audio/interactive computational language—AlloLib—a language created for the interactive representation of complex information in many fields of research. This will allow scientists, engineers and researchers in other fields to work with their information perceptually and intuitively, as well as technically, the way that artists do.
 
Meeting ID: 841 2398 4807

Abstract

A complex system is an arrangement of a great number of related but various elements with intricate relationships and interconnections. Complex systems typically have input from many sources and are highly changeable. They are difficult to model and predict. Components of a complex system may appear to act spontaneously such that predicting the outcome of the complete system at any given point of time may be difficult if not impossible. In this respect composing music is analogous to building a complex system. The system changes and unfolds over time at many different levels of temporal and spatial dimensions and the outcome of the total system may not be predictable at various stages of composing the work.
 
Music consists of various mathematical languages that build complex systems just as physics, chemistry, and biology, as well as economics and society and culture. If this is the case can one use the model of the music composition and performance in building a computational platform for composing and performing complex systems in any field of research?
 
In this lecture I will discuss how we can apply the creative compositional process in building our computational language and building the computational platform in the form of an orchestra or ensemble model in order to represent very complex information through our senses, namely visual and audio and interactive representations, just as composers compose a work of art and performers perform the work. This will facilitate using a distributed computational system such as the AlloSphere instrument and a visual/audio/interactive computational language AlloLib that we created for the instrument for the interactive representation of complex information in many fields of research. This will allow scientists, engineers and researchers in other fields to work with their information perceptually and intuitively, as well as technically, the way that artists do.

About the Composer

Dr. JoAnn Kuchera-Morin Composer, Director and Chief Scientist of the AlloSphere Research Facility (allosphere.ucsb.edu), is Professor of Media Arts and Technology and Music at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research focuses on creative computational systems, multi-modal media content, and facilities design. Her years of experience in digital media research led to the creation of a multi-million dollar sponsored research program for the University of California—the Digital Media Innovation Program. She was Chief Scientist of the Program from 1998 to 2003. The culmination of Professor Kuchera-Morin’s creativity and research is the AlloSphere, a 30-foot diameter, 3-story high metal sphere inside an echo-free cube, designed for immersive, interactive scientific and artistic investigation of multi-dimensional data sets. Scientifically, the AlloSphere is an instrument for gaining insight and developing bodily intuition about environments into which the body cannot venture—abstract higher-dimensional information spaces, the worlds of the very small or very large, and the realms of the very fast or very slow. Artistically, it is an instrument for the creation and performance of avant-garde new works and the development of new modes and genres of expression and forms of immersion-based entertainment. Professor Kuchera-Morin serves as the Director of the AlloSphere Research Facility located within the California NanoSystems Institute, Elings Hall, at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She earned a Ph.D. in composition from the Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester in 1984.
 
 
Dr. JoAnn Kuchera-Morin